MIP Consequences

A precious College degree, that you worked so hard for, may not be worth that much if you’ve been convicted of a MIP. A lot of companies and graduate programs perform background checks.  These background checks are done before a job offer is made or before someone is allowed to enter into a graduate program. A minor in possession of alcohol (MIP) could prevent you from getting that job offer or entry into the graduate program of your choice.

Many professions such as nursing, engineering, medicine and health professions, veterinary, education and law include, “good moral character” as a requirement for their licensure process. An MIP could complicate things for you in these professions. You need to take an MIP charge seriously. Don’t just go in and pled guilty without calling The Criminal Defense Law Center of West Michigan first at 616-438-6719.

An MIP Can Ruin Your Life

Is it that big of a deal to have an MIP on my record? A MIP may be on your record for life if you are convicted or have pled guilty. A person may be able to expunge the MIP from their record but the law typically after a certain period of time if you have no other alcohol related convictions.

If you do have a misdemeanor MIP on your record you could be responsible for revealing this information on any job applications for many advanced degree programs such as law school and medical school.  You need to contact the Criminal Defense Law Center of West Michigan today if you are facing an MIP. We know how to get you results!

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of:Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo, Zeeland and Allegan.

MIP Michigan

What do you do when you have been given a Minor in Possession of alcohol or “MIP?”  You need to call The Criminal Defense Law Center of West Michigan asap when you are given a ticket for an MIP. While you need to take this charge serious, there is no need to panic when you call The Criminal Defense law Center of West Michigan after you have been charged with an MIP>

Minor in Possession, MIP, is a misdemeanor in the state of Michigan. The penalties very depending on if this is your first MIP, or if this is your second or third offense.

In Michigan, you will be given a ticket  which will tell you what you have been charged with and when you need to appear at court. A district court will be assigned to handle your case.  Please check your MIP ticket very carefully to see what district court will be handling your ticket. You should be sure to check your ticket very carefully to determine which lower court is handling your case. If you have any questions, be sure to contact the district court listed on your MIP ticket or better yet, contact The Criminal Defense Law Center of West Michigan at 616-438-6719.

If you are charged with an MIP, please be polite when you show up to court. Do not show up to court drunk, or under the influence of alcohol. Furthermore, do as you are told at court. If they tell you to turn your cell phone off or to take your hat off do so!

Arraignment is your first apperance in Michigan. 

Most district courts in Michigan have the same process for handling misdemeanor charges, such as Minor in Possession of alcohol (MIP).  An arraignment for a MIP is simply a hearing date where the court must explain the charges to the individual and find out how they plead to the charge. A defendant can plead guilty, not guilty or stand mute (remain silent). If a defendant stands mute, the court will automatically enter a not guilty plea on his or her behalf.

Plead NOT GUILTY Or Stand Mute!

This is without doubt the most important piece of information on this site. Many students misunderstand their right to plead not guilty or to stand mute (stay silent) at their first appearance. They wrongly think that because they did drink and were caught that they will get in more trouble with the judge and the court if they do not plead guilty. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Our justice system cannot, and I repeat, CANNOT punish you for exercising your right to plead not guilty so that you can discuss your case with a prosecuting attorney or hire an attorney to fight on your behalf.

Tnd the prosecuting attorney’s office. You need to know that law enforcement officers will suggest charges for the prosecutors to authorize. They will execute a ticket or even a formal police report and submit them to the prosecuting attorney for review. Therefore, the prosecuting attorney can decide to authorize charges that are NOT on your written ticket. All the more reason to have your case handled by an experienced criminal defense attorney.

Dress Sharp!

The arraignment for your MIP is your first opportunity to appear before the judge that will most likely be handling your MIP.  Dress for success! Guys this means a suit and tie and ladies your best dress. When talking to the judge who will be handling your MIP, always address the judge as “your honor.”  Do not be late to court! Judes hate it when people come in late to court on their MIP charges.

Be Ready For Alcohol Testing

Some courts will alcohol or drug test at the first arraignment and you need to be prepared to answer that question for the judge. Many judges will ask you whether or not you will test clean and that it stays within your system for 30 days.

You should be prepared to answer that question honestly, as a dishonest response could land you in jail for a contempt of court charge.

Pleading Guilty To A MIP Equals Giving Up Your Rights!

In most courts the judges will simply take the not guilty plea and set a pretrial conference, usually giving the student a hearing date at the initial arraignment. There are some courts that will do an arraignment/pretrial and have the meeting with the prosecutor at that time in order to try to dispose of the case.

Too many college students and young people believe that if they did drink, if they did fail a breathalyzer, if they did admit to drinking, that they must plead guilty.  False! It is everyone’s constitutional right to plead not guilty regardless of whether or not you are actually guilty. It is the burden of the prosecutor to prove their case beyond a reasonable doubt whether it is a murder case or a MIP charge carrying no jail time. In other states the court process will be very similar, but you should check with an attorney in that state for the exact specifics of how the courts handle the initial appearance, arraignment and bond.

Pretrial Conference

This is an opportunity for your lawyer to speak with the prosecuting attorney.  Your attorney will prepare for the hearing and be the one who will speak with the prosecutor and try to negotiate a plea on your behalf.

Final Pretrial

If you cannot come to a resolution with the prosecutor in your MIP pretrial conference, you have the right to demand a jury trial or a non-jury trial. If you demand a jury trial it will typically be set for a final pretrial with the prosecuting attorney so that the courts can determine which cases are going to actually go on that day and which are going to be resolved the day before trial. T

The final pretrial is the last opportunity to resolve or to negotiate a plea in your MIP case.  If you cannot resolve the case and you have chosen a jury trial, there will be a jury selection and you can have the actual jury trial the next day.

Jury Trial

An actual jury trial could take place if no resolution can be reached in your MIP case. In Michigan, the right to a jury trial has been secured by defense attorneys taking cases all the way to the Michigan Supreme Court.  Some jurisdictions will complete the jury selection first.  After your MIP jury selection, the jury trial will begin and the prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that you were a minor in possession of alcohol.

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of:Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo, Zeeland and Allegan.

Indecent Exposure

Anthony Currier is a 29 year old man who lives in Holland, Michigan. He was charged with indecent exposure by a sexually delinquent person after he was accused of showing off his private parts to an 11 year old according Mlive.com.

Those who engage in the type of criminal sexual conduct, rarely only do it one time.  So it comes as no surprise that police believe Currier may have engaged in indecent exposure to other minors.  Mr. Currier is a registered sex offender following a 2005 conviction for fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct in Ottawa County.

Allegedly the most recent indecent exposure incidents took place between September 6th and 9th. On September 6th, Mr. Currier engaged in indecent exposure near 19th street and Washington Avenue. It is also alleged that Mr. Currier exposed himself near Black River Public School. More charges may be coming against Mr. Currier for indecent exposure.  Mr. Currier bond is currently set at $200,000. Obviously, he won’t be going anywhere anytime soon as he was living at the Holland Rescue Mission at the time of his arrest.

Misdemeanor indecent exposure is a crime punishable by up to one year in jail.  The law provides that if the person was fondling his or her genitals, pubic area, buttocks or if the person is female, breasts, while indecently exposed, the person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment of not more than two years.

The problem for Mr. Currier is that he is considered a sexually delinquent person.  This means the violation is punishable by up to life in prison.  A sexually delinquent person is a person who has engaged in repetitive acts or acts considered compulsive that show a disregard of consequences of recognized rights of others.

If you are charged with indecent exposure you need to hire a serious criminal defense attorney to represent you. The Criminal Defense Law Center of West Michigan can offer you such attorneys. It is easy to be accused falsely of this type of crime.  Don’t wait, visithttp://www.criminaldefenselawcenterwestmichigan.com today!

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of:Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo, Zeeland and Allegan.

Distracted Driving

Is distracted driving as bad as drunk driving?  Cell phones are carried around by people everywhere.  This includes when people drive. Distracted driving incldues drivers talk on their cell phones while driving, send texts while driving and surf the internet while driving. While this behavior is against the law in many states, distracted drivers continue to do it on a regular basis. A study a few years ago was done to compare distracted driving and drunk driving and see what the statistics say about accidents and how much danger drunk driving and distracting driving are.

According to a study done by the University of Utah, people who are distracted while driving by using their cell phones caused more accidents than drivers who were drunk.  People who used their cell phone while driving were less responsive and more impaired those who drove with a BAC of .08 or higher.

The study was partially based on a simulator which let the researches determine how the study subjects reacted when a vehicle appeared in front of them.  The people using the simulator with a .08 BAC or higher caused no more accidents than normal drivers. People who were using their cell phones were eight percent slower in their reaction time.

The fine for texting while driving in Michigan is typically a $100 fine. A DUI conviction includes up to 93 days in jail, a suspension of the drivers license, probation and community service.

Driving while under the influence (DUI) is a serious offense in Michigan. You need to visit our web page today, http://www.criminaldefenselawcenterwestmichigna.com for aggressive and experienced lawyers to help you out on your DUI charge. Don’t wait!

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of:Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo, Zeeland and Allegan.

Felony Charges Dismissed.

 

We are criminal defense attorneys who like getting felony charges dismissed for our clients. In fact, we feel it is one of the best feelings in the world to get felony charges dismissed against our clients. 

Our client was facing two bogus felony charges.  We ran the preliminary exam and the prosecutor realized how weak the case was and decided he needed to have the felony charges dismissed.

We are not afraid to fight for our clients. We know that sometimes good people make mistakes. We realize that sometimes our clients are innocent.  We realize that sometimes our clients are charged for a felony when they are only guilty of a misdemeanor.

Getting felony charges dismissed doesn’t happen all the time, but when you have the right legal representation, the odds of you getting a dismissal are higher.

If you want to get your felony charges dismissed, please visit http://www.criminaldefenselawcenterwestmichigan.com today!

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of:Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo, Zeeland and Allegan.

Michigan Embezzlement Laws

Michigan Laws And Penalties

The charges and penalties a person may face after being convicted of embezzlement in the state of Michigan will greatly depend upon the value of the property in question:

  • Property valued at less than $200: When the property in question is valued at under $200, a person will face penalties that can include a fine of up to $500, or 3 times the value of the property, as well as up to 93 days in jail. If the property was found to have been embezzled from a charity organization, however, the fine will increase to $2,000 or up to 1 year in jail.
  • Property valued between $200 and $1,000: In embezzlement cases where the property has been valued at between $200 and $1,000, a person may face a fine of up to $2,000 or 3 times the value of the property, as well as 1 year in jail. If prior convictions are to have been found, or the property was taken from a charity organization, a person may face a fine up to $10,000 and/or 5 years in prison.
  • Property valued between $1,000 and $20,000: If the property is found to be valued at between $1,000 and $20,000, a person will then face penalties of a fine not exceeding $10,000 as well as up to 5 years in prison. If the person facing charges has prior convictions or the property was taken from a charitable organization, these penalties will raise to a $15,000 fine as well as 10 years in prison.
  • Property valued at between $20,000 and $50,000: If the embezzled property is valued at between $20,000 and $50,000 in the state of Michigan, a person will face punishments of a fine of $15,000, or 3 times the value of the property, as well as up to 15 years in prison.
  • Property valued at between $50,000 and $100,000: For embezzlement cases with property valued at between $50,000 and $100,000, a person may face fines of up to $25,000 or 3 times the value of the property, whichever is greater, as well as up to 15 years in prison.
  • Property valued at $100,000 or more: For extreme Michigan embezzlement cases involving property valued at over $100,000 a person may face a fine of $50,000, or 3 times the value of the property as well as up to 20 years in prison.

Michigan Embezzlement Penalties

In the state of Michigan, a person will face harsher penalties if the value of the property or money embezzled is of a greater amount, and the state has value ranges in which certain charges and penalties will fall under. These ranges include not only monetary embezzling, but the embezzling of personal property as well, and a person can know what charges and penalties they face if they know what their embezzled property is worth.

Those charged with embezzling in the state of Michigan can face either felony or misdemeanor charges depending on the value of the property they embezzled.

Statute Of Limitations On Michigan

The statue of limitations for embezzlement charges in Michigan is 6 years, which means that the crime had to have been committed within 6 years of the defendant being charged. This limitation is put into place for both felony and misdemeanor embezzlement cases, however under tolling provision, the statute does not run during a time when the defendant does not reside within the state.

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of:Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo, Zeeland and Allegan.

Kent City man charged with Criminal Sexual Conduct.

 

A man in Kent City has been charged with first and second degree criminal sexual conduct after it was alleged that he sexually assaulted a girl who was only nine years old at the time of the alleged assault.   According to an article in Mlive.com, David Fricke waived his probable cause hearing last week and remains jailed on a bond of $10,000.

 The Mlive.com article states that Fricke allegedly had sexual relations with the victim last November.  Mr. Fricke claimed the girl initiated the sexual contact. Mr. Fricke claimed that he was taking a shower and the girl approached him and that he asked her to leave.  Fricke claimed to have found the girl in his bed at some point after the shower as well.

The charge of first-degree criminal sexual conduct carries serious prison time! The maximum prison term for first-degree CSC is life!

Engaging in any sexual contact with a girl that young is illegal.  In Michigan, having sexual contact with a child who is under the age of 13 is the most serious of the criminal sexual conduct charges (CSC 1st). When children are involved, it can be tough to determine if the child was assaulted or the person charged with the crime was wrongly accused.  Children can be coerced into making up stories of being assaulted sometimes by a parent.

If you are facing any criminal sexual conduct charge in Michigan, contact us immediately!

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of: Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Zeeland, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo and Allegan.

The Cost of a DUI in Michigan

Most people associate monetary fines and possible jail time as the costs of Michigan drunk driving conviction. While these maybe the most common costs related to a DUI, you should be aware of many other costs.

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Here’s a look at five hidden costs of a DUI conviction:

1. Employment. A DUI may go on your criminal record. If your job requires that you maintain a clean driving record or have a valid driver’s license, you could potentially lose your job or miss out on a new job opportunity. Another factor is all the time away from work when you must attend your mandatory appearance court dates.

2. Mandatory Jail. Any conviction for DUI carries mandatory jail time. For a first offense, it is either 24 or 48 consecutive hours (or 15 or 30 days of electronic home monitoring). The jail time and house arrest goes up exponentially on second or subsequent convictions for driving under the influence.

3. Auto Insurance. Any increased auto insurance premiums due to drunk driving can have a much longer lasting effect than a one-time monetary fine. A conviction for DUI carries the requirement that you carry high risk (SR-22) insurance.

4. Driving Record. A DUI conviction will go on your driving record and will trigger a driver’s license suspension or revocation.

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of: Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Zeeland, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo and Allegan.

Criminal Defense West Michigan

While it’s something that most people don’t necessarily plan for or  anticipate, if you are ever in need of criminal defense, qualified  legal counsel is in order. In order to achieve results you are hoping  for in a legal case, you won’t want to leave anything to chance. A  conscientious and aggressive defense can be the difference between a  conviction and an acquittal.

The Criminal Defense Law Center will begin by assessing your case to  determine if there might be errors that would warrant its immediate  dismissal.  We will investigate factual claims, seek witnesses and thoroughly interview each witness and police officer.  Don’t leave your future, your job,  your family at risk – contact The Criminal Defense Law Center of West Michigan  immediately for a  free confidential consultation and evaluation of your situation today.

When you are arrested or charged with a crime in Michigan, you  have many important rights. These rights are guaranteed by the United  States Constitution.  The Criminal Defense Law Center of West Michigan knows what these rights are and how to defend your constiutionally protected rights.

You have a right to speak with an attorney.

The police must advise you that you have a right to speak with an  attorney as soon as practical after your arrest. If you request to speak  with an attorney, the police may not ask you any questions about the  incident until you have had an opportunity to speak with an attorney. It is never in your best interest to talk to the police without first talking to a competent attorney.

You have a right to refuse to answer any questions.

A law enforcement officer may require you to identify yourself, but  cannot require you to make statements or answer any questions. Any  information you provide to the officer can (and probably will) be used  if charges are filed against you at a later time. This is true even if  you do not give a formal, signed “statement.” It is always better to  decline to make any statements or answer a question until after you have  consulted with a lawyer.

You have a right to be brought before a judge to address your release from jail.

If you are arrested and booked into jail, you have a right to be  brought before a judge to address your detention and set bail and/or  conditions for your release. This generally occurs between 24 and 72  hours of your arrest.

You have a right to plead not guilty at arraignment.

A plea of not guilty at arraignment will not be held against you at  any time. In fact, many courts will not allow you to plead guilty to a  serious charge without consulting an attorney first.

You have a right to an attorney.

You have a right to have an attorney of your choosing represent you  throughout the entire criminal process and for that attorney to be  present with you at all court hearings. If you cannot afford an attorney  and qualify financially, the court will appoint a public defender to  represent you.

You have a right to a speedy and public jury trial.

You have a right to a speedy and public trial by jury. A speedy trial  is one that occurs no more than ninety days from your first court  appearance if you are out of custody (jail) or sixty days if you are in  custody (jail). Your trial would occur in a courtroom open to the  public. Your jury would consist of people from the community who would  hear all the evidence presented and make a decision as to your guilt or  innocence.

You have a right to be presumed innocent.

You have a right to be considered innocent of any criminal charge  until you are convicted or until you enter a plea of guilty. However,  the court does have the power to impose certain conditions while the  case is pending against you – this can include no contact orders, orders  to not drive without ignition interlock, or even the posting of bail or  bond.

You have a right to be convicted by proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

You have a right to require that the prosecutor prove every element  of a charge beyond a reasonable doubt. This is the highest burden of  proof in the legal system. As a defendant, you are not required to  present any evidence or prove your innocence.

You have a right to confront witnesses who testify against you.

You have a right to confront and cross-examine all witnesses  testifying against you. This means that the prosecutor will subpoena  witnesses to testify against you, and you (through your attorney) will  be able to question these witnesses.

You have a right to call witnesses to testify on your behalf.

You have a right to call witnesses who can testify on your behalf.  These witnesses can be compelled to appear in court by subpoena. You  have a right to testify or not testify. You have a right to remain  silent and not incriminate yourself. This means that if you choose not  to, no one can force you to take the stand and testify. If you choose  not to testify, this cannot be held against you.

You also have the right to testify.

If you choose to testify, the prosecuting attorney is allowed to  cross-examine you about your case and anything you say while testifying.

You have a right to appeal a conviction or sentence.

If you are convicted of a criminal charge you have a right to appeal this conviction to a higher court.

Our Services Include:

Criminal Traffic Matters

  • DUI & (Multiple DUI Offenses)
  • Negligent Driving
  • Reckless Driving
  • Driving While License Suspended
  • Failure to Maintain Interlock Ignition Device
  • Hit and Run

Domestic Violence

  • Assault
  • Stalking
  • Cyberstalking
  • Harassment

Theft

  • Theft & Shoplifting
  • Burglary
  • Robber

Drug Crimes

  • Possession of Marijuana Over 40 grams
  • Medical Marijuana Defense
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance
  • Delivery of a Controlled Substance
  • Distribution of a Controlled Substance
  • Manufacturing a Controlled Substance

Other Crimes

  • Murder
  • Manslaughter
  • Sex Crimes

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of: Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Zeeland, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo and Allegan.

What to do if I am arrested?

If you are arrested for a crime in West Michigan, the first question that goes through many people’s minds is what should I do when I am arrested? This is a good question and I will give the reader some helpful hints as to what they should do.

1.  If you are arrested you should stop talking to police!  The police are not your friends and they are not there to help you if you are being investigated for a crime.

2. If you are arrested you should call a lawyer immediately! The earlier you get a lawyer working hard for you on your case the better your chances of getting a good resolution to your case.

3.  Be respectful and polite to the police! Just because you aren’t answering their questions about the crime you are being investigated for doesn’t mean you have to be a jerk about it.

4.  Preserve any and all information that you have which may help your case.  Keep any letters, names of witnesses, phone numbers of witnesses and video recording that you may have that can help your case.

Our Criminal Defense Lawyers in West Michigan Proudly Serve: Kent County, Ottawa County, Allegan County, Ionia County, Barry County, Berrien County, Mason County, Manistee County, Mecosta County, Oceana County, Muskegon County, Montcalm County, Newaygo County, Kalamazoo County, Lake County, Van Buren County, and the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Our Grand Rapids Criminal Lawyers Also Proudly Serve The West Michigan Cities Of: Grand Rapids, Holland, Allendale, Wyoming, Kentwood, Grandville, Walker, Hudsonville, Grand Haven, Coopersville, Spring Lake, Ionia, Zeeland, Hastings, Stanton, White Cloud, Newaygo and Allegan.